Friday, January 22, 2010

Callarion at Night Update -- Part I don't know anymore

CALLARION AT NIGHT has now ballooned from 231 pages, 23 chapters, and 62,000 words to 270 pages, 28 chapters, and 72,000 words. Yes, folks, I have added about 10,000 words since I said I "finished" the book. And there's a chapter I finished today that hasn't even been flowed into the main text yet -- add another 4,000 words and 13 pages.

Of course, I made half a dozen decisions to alter the storyline since I "finished" that draft too. Now, I still want my betas to read the versions they have, because about 75% of the events in the story are going to stay the same. Everything that I've sent to you fine folks will be incorporated in some fashion into this version (and might be preserved entirely depending on what it is).

Ay yi yi revisions are effing hard aren't they?

9 comments:

Shannon O'Donnell said...

Yes. they. are! No question. My last two posts are about revision, but I don't think there is really a way to get around the fact that it is a difficult beast. Ugh! :-)

Bane of Anubis said...

You're a better man than me -- I have a very difficult time writing/seaming in extra scenes.

L. T. Host said...

I always have to go back and add stuff when I'm done with my first draft. That's what betas are for, after all-- to help you make it better!

Adam Heine said...

I'm glad you said that about the versions we still have. I've been wondering :-)

Gary Corby said...

It's funny you should mention this; it came up in a conversation I had just this morning.

I have a theory that the only two skills required of a writer are a willingness to revise for as long as it takes, and the ability to tell which of two versions is better.

Given those two, you're guaranteed to eventually produce a good book.

Matthew Delman said...

Gary --

One of my writer friends said at point that novels are not written, they're rewritten.

And yes, the dogged persistence to rewrite things dozens of times and be able to tell when it's better are truly the only keys to being a good writer. Because no one writes a perfect first draft.

Gary Corby said...

You weren't a drinking buddy of James Michener, were you? I think he said he was a poor writer but a very good rewriter. Sounds like the same person.

Matthew Delman said...

Michener died when I was 14, so I can unequivocally say that no, I wasn't a drinking buddy of his.

Also: I had to look him up before I posted this response to see if he was the guy who wrote Hawaii.

Gary Corby said...

Damn, I just gave away my advanced age. :-)